Bar rescue owner ousted online dating

Just now, of course, the emotion at the center of this particular rogue’s gallery is hate.

These days hate has roughly the same role in popular culture that original sin has in traditional Christian theology.

If you wanted to define anything as utterly beyond the pale, you just had to label it as “immoral”—in the jargon of the time, this meant “sexual”—and the vast majority of people were expected to recoil from it in horror.

It’s the conviction that certain common human emotions are evil and harmful and wrong, and the way to make a better world is to get rid of them in one way or another.

That belief is taken for granted throughout the industrial societies of the modern West, and it’s been welded in place for a very long time, though—as we’ll see in a moment—the particular emotions so labeled have varied from time to time.

It occurred to me the other day that there’s a curious disconnect between one of the most common assumptions most of us make about how to make the world better, on the one hand, and the results that this assumption has had when put into practice, on the other.

It’s reminiscent of the realization that led James Hillman and Michael Ventura to title a once-notorious book of theirs .

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