Dating old photos props

1860s If you look at the image of the standing person in the photo (or lady sitting on a chair) and you can see both head and feet with a carpet some old furniture and studio props such as a curtain, the man may have a jacket buttoned only at the top and the woman has a down to the ground wide dress and her ears cannot be seen for the hair covering it and the back of the card has a simple print for the photographers name and the cardboard feels a bit thin - it is from the first half of the 1860s. Men wore lounge suits with matching waistcoats by the middle of the decade.

1870s If the portrait is a half or three-quarter (no feet) the ladies hair is less severe, with perhaps a curl, and perhaps much jewellery and perhaps sitting down in a more casual way, clothes trimmed with lace or tassles.

The first possibility of the save the date is the photo.

Although photos of the happy bride and groom-to-be are always nice, they are very common and are basically tantamount to an engagement photo.

This may mean hanging the banner in the background or wrapping it around the two of you in a hug.

To be different by arranging the banner in different ways.

The card may have rounded corners - (mid to late 1870s). (Some still show full length and a carpet in the early 1870s) 1880s The ladies dress may be severe and close fitting or it has a bustle (1881-1886 ish), skirts had pleated edges, boys wore sailor suits and velvet suits, Men did not wear frock coats and wore a morning-coat suit or a lounge suit, top hat, bowler or straw hat.

Norfolk jackets were popular as were more casual clothes.

Plain backs with the photographer's name on the lower front, some like this occur from about 1889.

Many cabinet card seem to date from the 1880s and 1890s 1900 and after Wide sleeved blouses were still worn for a few years, but for many this was the era of the blouse and simple skirt and straw boater hat, and wide hats for special occasions.

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