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Most of us can broadly trace our ancestral roots to a country or general region on the planet.

But a new DNA test can locate where your relatives lived over 1,000 years ago, and in some cases, even pinpoint the specific village or island your ancestors came from.

Eran Elhaik of the University of Sheffield and Tatiana Tatarinova from the University of Southern California invented the Geographic Population Structure (GPS) test, which works by scanning a person’s DNA for parts that were formed as a result of two ancestors from disparate populations having children: for example, a Viking and Briton falling in love after Vikings invaded Britain in the 11 century.

Once a mixed DNA signature is detected, it is compared with reference data from people around the world that haven’t moved for hundreds of years.

The Lake Mungo remains are three prominent sets of human remains: Lake Mungo 1 (also called Mungo Woman, LM1, and ANU-618), Lake Mungo 3 (also called Mungo Man, Lake Mungo III, and LM3), and Lake Mungo 2 (LM2).

Lake Mungo is in New South Wales, Australia, specifically the World Heritage listed Willandra Lakes Region.

The new DNA test was over 80 percent successful in tracing people from around the world back to their ancestral origins.

The reconstruction and description were mainly done by Alan Thorne at the Australian National University.

If you are interested in tracing your DNA back to its origin, you’ll need to provide a saliva sample, pay about 0 to have your DNA read, and pay an additional to have your ancestral home identified.

You can begin your quest by visiting Prosapia Genetics online.

Finally, a computer program calculates how close to these populations a person’s ancestors lived and pinpoints a location.

Elhaik applied the GPS test to roughly 600 individuals from around the world—including regions as far-flung as Kuwait, Puerto Rico, Bermuda and Peru.

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