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You might not care about all three, but you’ll probably care about one: 1. Look at the Living Social breach as an example: 50 million people’s names, emails, birthdates, and encrypted passwords gone in one hack. The company misuses it in a way you didn’t expect or intend, that violates your privacy, or that makes you uncomfortable. Privacy laws certainly need an overhaul, but regulation isn’t an immediate solution for the everyday Internet user.

Facebook is a champion of this kind of misuse by constantly changing its privacy policies and eroding default protections. For more in-depth guides, we recommend the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Surveillance Self Defense site and

Also note that 1), some of these tools are kind of complicated if you aren’t tech savvy; and 2), many require 2-way encryption to work (so both you and the person you’re communicating with would have to have it installed).

Fortunately, there are ways you can avoid going through this whole ordeal in the first place. First things first – cover your cameras when you’re not using them.‘More technical indicators that are more difficult to obfuscate include the transmission of audio or video traffic from the device, the presence of running webcam processes and services, audio and video storage files and logs.’ Cleaning your devices up when they’ve been compromised is even trickier – but it’s do-able.The first thing Scott says you should do is immediately cover your camera with a plaster or something, so the perpetrators can’t watch you anymore.Staying more private means keeping your data out of the hands of the private companies that feed the government.Once the private sector collects personal data, three main things can happen to it. Whether you’re concerned with 1, 2, or 3, the results are the same and the solution for consumers is the same: use tools and best practices to avoid private companies from ever getting your data in the first place.

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